Category Archives: Public Space

Lots of Possibility: Grassroots vacant lot project with Mural Arts Program underway in Germantown

One of the biggest issues facing W Rockland Street has been managing the block’s new public spaces. In 2014, Aine and I submitted a proposal to the City of Philadelphia’s Mural Arts Program aimed at improving conditions within the vacant lot on the corner of W Rockland Street and Greene Street. We are excited to announce it was approved! The project is now underway and will be completed during the summer months of 2015.

Lot at the corner of W Rockland Street & Greene Street

Lot at the corner of W Rockland Street & Greene Street

The proposed project aims to activate and beautify the vacant lot. The highly visible location makes it possible to further the connection between neighboring blocks around W Rockland and bolster what we’re building here. Improvements will include light landscaping and features that help to break-up the space, making it easier to maintain and inviting use; the installation of a community message board; new plantings and flowers; and a mural on the facade of the last house of W Rockland Street. The mural, visible from Greene Street, will face the open space. The project may also include other interventions developed during the community engagement process.

We hope to make our grassroots neighborhood revitalization efforts more sustainable by turning this vacant space into a safe place for residents.

The project is designed to be temporary but durable and accomadate long-term temporary use, in this period between blight and possible redevelopment.

It will also be accessible and costs will be kept low, so that the ideas put in place here can be easily replicated by anyone elsewhere – from your average D-I-Y citizen to grassroots community groups like ours.

Zoom around this Google Map of the space and get a lay of the land. 4819 Greene is owned by the City of Philadelphia; 4817 Greene is privately owned by the tax delinquent and missing-in-action Church of God by Faith; and 4815 Greene is owned by the Philadelphia Housing Authority. Special shoutout to the lady crossing the street in the satellite image!

THE WALL

Michelle Oosterbaan, a contemporary artist working with the Mural Arts Program, will paint the mural. Oosterbaan is currently working on the color pallet and mural concept, after meeting with residents and talking about the ideas and things they would like the mural to evoke. Her abstract mural at Philadelphia Center for Arts and Technology (PCAT) in West Oak Lane is what first caught our eye.

The mural will add beauty and brightness to Southwest Germantown and link the houses on W Rockland and Greene. The side-wall of the house where the mural will be painted was previously blocked by the abandoned properties that once stood on Greene Street, and now has a new audience.

Kevon flies a paper airplane in October 2013 in front of 74 W Rockland St, where the mural will be installed.

Kevon flies a paper airplane in October 2013 in front of 74 W Rockland St, where the mural will be installed.

Michelle Oosterbaan’s “Pulse” at Philadelphia Center for Art and Technology, a collaboration with the Mural Arts Program.

EMPOWERING D-I-Y CITIZENS

Many people think maintaining vacant land is really the city’s responsibility, and that might be true. But shouldn’t it be easier for residents who want to care for and reimagine these spaces? With this project, we think we can make it easier.

It seems kind of bonkers that the solution for community-managed vacant land tends to go from keeping lots litter free and the grass mowed, to community gardens and urban farms, with little in-between. A fence around a vacant lot is sometimes not enough. And let’s face it, community gardens are hard – we know this because we built one in another vacant lot at the top of our block. We want to uncover more creative in-between uses for vacant lots that can be done on the cheap. 

At the same time, there are many residents living in Philly neighborhoods, like ours, that lack resources and organizational capacity to take on this kind of project from scratch. We think they just need a how-to. 

Every part of this project will be documented and shared online here at rocklandstreet.com for anyone to adapt or copy what we’ve tried, without having to reinvent the wheel. We’ll post tips for getting neighborhood participation, detailed instructions for how to create anything we build for the lot, clever fundraising tactics, and more.

OFF THE WALL

Interestingly, this wide open space is a relatively new addition to our neighborhood fabric, thanks to the demolition of two abandoned rowhouses that towered over the community, some say for over 20 years.

It wasn’t until June 2011 that the footprints of the looming three-story houses (4815 Greene and 4817 Greene St) joined the adjacent overgrown lot (4819 Greene), already a popular illegal dump site.

The story of how that happened is not exactly typical.

Over Memorial Day Weekend in 2011, Mayor of Philadelphia Michael Nutter paid a surprise visit to the block to see the Grow This Block! garden project – a day on which over 30 households on W Rockland St planted fruit, veggie, herb, and flower gardens in their front yards. The Mayor had read an article by Inga Saffron about the planting project in The Philadelphia Inquirer and showed up with the newspaper in-hand. It was then that he toured the block and saw the condition of the abandoned properties.

Wildness. Google Maps image of the space in 2008.

Wildness. Google Maps image of the space in 2008.

L&I had already declared the buildings imminently dangerous, after a re-inspection requested by the community. But within days of the Mayor’s visit, the demolition was scheduled.

“When neighbors are trying to make something happen, we, the city, have to meet them halfway,” Mayor Nutter told the Inquirer.

What happened next is perhaps more typical.

After the houses were demolished (yay!) the lot was left unprotected without a fence, and the ground remained a sandy pit with bits and pieces of rock and concrete from the houses (doh!). Soon cars and trucks began parking in the lot and illegal dumping returned. Navigating what to do next was challenging.

By 2013, it was clear we had to find an alternative use for the vacant lot and work to turn the space into something that neighbors could enjoy. We began with simple beautification projects. We also hosted community events in the lot, including yard sales and a kids Halloween party.

The bottom of the block began to look and feel differently. It began to look like a space people cared about.

The question now is how to make more people care about this vacant lot (and others around the city), which is a big part of what this project is all about.

LOTS OF POSSIBILITY

Taking action
2009 – 2011
In 2009, residents on W Rockland St began organizing cleanups of the lot and the abandoned properties, working to maintain the area and put an end to illegal dumping.  Philly Spring Cleanup, April 4, 2009.

In 2009, residents on W Rockland St began organizing cleanups of the abandoned properties, working to maintain the space and put an end to illegal dumping. Philly Spring Cleanup, April 4, 2009.

4819 Greene St after W Rockland St Project’s Philly Spring Cleanup 2009 project in which the lot was cleaned.

4819 Greene St after W Rockland St Project’s Philly Spring Cleanup 2009 project in which the lot was cleaned.

4819, 4817, 4815 Greene St after W Rockland St Project’s Philly Spring Cleanup 2009 project in which the lot was cleaned and graffiti was removed from the front of the houses.

4819, 4817, 4815 Greene St after W Rockland St Project’s Philly Spring Cleanup 2009 project in which the lot was cleaned and graffiti was removed from the front of the houses.

Demolition of 4817 and 4815 Greene St in June 2011, funded by the Neighborhood Stabilization Program (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development), managed by the Redevelopment Authority.

Demolition of 4817 and 4815 Greene St in June 2011, funded by the Neighborhood Stabilization Program (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development), managed by the Redevelopment Authority.

W Rockland St's very own sand lot. The condition  of the lot after the demolition of the houses in June 2011.

W Rockland St’s very own sand lot. The condition of the lot after the demolition of the houses in June 2011.

Germantown Beach. Kids play in the sand lot in September 2011.

Germantown Beach. Kids play in the sand lot in September 2011.

An evolving space
2012 – 2015

GET INVOLVED

If you’re interested in helping make this project happen and supporting The W Rockland Street Project, there are lots of opportunities to get involved.

Our first community meeting was held on Monday, June 22 at the steps of the DePaul Catholic School. Join us at the next one (date TBD) and contact us if you have immediate questions.

We will be working to increase communication and engagement with residents of the 4800 block of Greene St, who face the vacant lot, the flanking 100 blocks of Logan St and Wyneva St, the 4800 block of Germantown Ave, and other surrounding blocks.

Sign-up for our email list! Keep up with The W Rockland Street Project! We’ll send very occasional emails with stories from the block, along with updates about our vacant lot project with Mural Arts Program.


Full disclosure: Emaleigh Doley is currently working on the Mural Arts Program’s citywide public art exhibition Open Source (coming October 2015) as a programming consultant. The idea and development of this project however predates that engagement. 

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Making Art on Germantown Avenue

IMG_6521If you are wondering what’s behind that giant black screen at 6350 Germantown Avenue, I can tell you it’s not a junkyard. Although that might be up for interpretation. The property is the studio of visual artists Kate Kaman and Joel Erland. I stopped by for a somewhat bizarre little visit after the Germantown Town Hall workshop today. The space is open to the public this weekend for Philadelphia Open Studio Tours from October 10-11, noon to 6pm.

As I rambled around the studio, I was excited to see a small mockup of the large scale work The Unseen World, which may have caught your eye if you travel along North Broad Street between Germantown and Center City.

IMG_6522

The suspended illuminated sculptures are on display inside the atrium of Temple University’s newish School of Medicine building and visible from the street. Turns out they’re bacteria! And this is a Kaman + Erland work! The artists worked closely with the architecture and engineering firm Ballinger while creating the piece, which is a signature feature of the building’s public spaces.

Now you know what’s behind the screen. Visit http://ekeart.com for more on their work.

And thanks to Germantown Artist Round Table‘s Paula Paul for the POST reminder, and for handing me a photo copy of the guide page listing all of the studios in Germantown participating! Get to know your neighborhood artists. 

More photos

The Move to Remake Maplewood Mall, See Plans at September 9 Public Meeting

After two years of planning, the City of Philadelphia is moving forward with efforts to revitalize Maplewood Mall in Germantown. A public meeting and presentation of draft alternatives for the reconstruction project will be held on Tuesday, September 9 from 7pm to 8:30pm at First Presbyterian Church at 35 West Chelten Avenue.

Attendees will have the opportunity to provide comment and help steer the design of Mall, which is located just off of Armat Street, between Germantown Avenue and Greene Street.

There has been much excitement about this latest opportunity to revitalize the street. Just how much excitement? Here’s six seconds from the first Re-imagining Maplewood Mall block party which was held on June 22, 2013.

The failed urban Mall was conceived in the 1970s as a mixed-use pedestrian street. That didn’t quite work out as planned, for a number of reasons. The flow of cars and pedestrians is but one problem. General maintenance and crumbling infrastructure is another chronic issue. Bradley Maule at Hidden City Philadelphia offers an overview of all that went wrong.

Weeds and more weeds pop through the brick sidewalk. Photo by Emaleigh Doley. July 25, 2014.

Weeds and more weeds pop through the brick sidewalk. Photo by Emaleigh Doley. July 25, 2014.

Neighbors in Germantown plotting what they'd like to see improve in Maplewood Mall. Photo by Emaleigh Doley. June 22,2013.

Neighbors in Germantown plotting what they’d like to see improve in Maplewood Mall. Photo by Emaleigh Doley. June 22,2013.

Photo by Emaleigh Doley. April 10, 2014.

Photo by Emaleigh Doley. April 10, 2014.

In May 2014, it was announced that Whitman, Requardt & Associates (WRA) will serve as the design and engineering team, alongside LRSLA Studio who was selected as the landscape architects for the project. WRA “most recently led the design and engineering for the conversion of the Manayunk Bridge from an abandoned rail bridge to the City’s first pedestrian/bicycle-only crossing of the Schuylkill River” (currently under construction). LRSLA Studio’s work will also be familiar to many. Recent public space projects include The Porch at 30th Street Station and Hawthorne Park in South Philadelphia.

press release issued by Matt Wysong and the Philadelphia City Planning Commission noted that:
“The City seeks to go beyond just a bricks and mortar reconstruction of the street and engage in a “placemaking” project. Through review of community visioning, consideration of previous studies, and the injection of professional expertise, the consultant team will provide a design that will create a framework for the reinvention of the Mall into a vibrant and successful urban space.
 
This project is unique in its inter-agency collaboration. The City’s project team includes 8th District Councilwoman Cindy Bass, Department of Commerce, Parks & Recreation, City Planning Commission, Capital Projects Office, and Department of Streets. The project will be paid for using Department of Commerce neighborhood commercial corridor capital funding.
 
The scope of professional services shall include: preliminary, final design and construction documents for bidding. The Consultant Team will consider various alternatives for realigning and reconfiguring the roadway and plazas, traffic restrictions on the Mall, the functionality of spaces for events and pedestrian use, sustainable design practices, the provision of parking, maintaining access for loading and drop off, the incorporation of site specific public art, the possibility of new development parcels, and the use of construction materials and methods that allow for easy maintenance and repair in the future… Design and engineering are anticipated for completion in May of 2015. Construction will commence following an additional bid process.”
 
 
maplewood_mall_flyer
Contact: Matt Wysong, Philadelphia City Planning Commission, 215.683.4650

Lower Germantown Streetscape Project Set for June 21

On Saturday, June 21 over two dozen planters and tree pits will be planted with vibrant annuals and perennials on a two-block stretch of Germantown Avenue between Penn Street and Bringhurst Street. The zone was selected by Tree Germantown and the W Rockland Street Project as a corridor greening pilot experiment.

Despite lacking a formal business association, this lesser-known Germantown business district is full of life with the addition of two new businesses, Sandalwood Yoga Studio and the soul food restaurant Tasties.

There are also three building renovations underway including new construction for Around The Clock Home Health Care just before Penn Street, developer Ken Weinstein’s renovation of the 6-story building at 5301 Germantown Avenue, and Stan Smith’s renovation of 5320 Germantown Avenue. Tracy McNeil, owner of the yoga studio at 5310 Germantown Avenue, recently completed a historic renovation of the property which includes the storefront studio on the street-level and apartments on the upper floors (read about the renovation at NewsWorks.org).

Google Maps capture of Germantown Avenue from Penn Street looking towards Bringhurst Street.

Google Maps capture of Germantown Avenue from Penn Street looking towards Bringhurst Street.

 

Aine Doley (that’s me!) and Penn Knox resident Amy Steinbugler went door-to-door to pitch the planting project and discuss the benefits of bringing greenery to Germantown Avenue. Many businesses were eager to join the effort, but some took convincing.

Those who declined to participate raised concerns about the plantings being able to survive the urban environment and the shoppers who frequent businesses along the corridor. Will the planters be stolen? Will passersby put trash in the planters? One business owner believed that people would urinate in the planters and sit on them while waiting for the 23 bus.

The participating businesses and organizations willing to give greenery a chance in the neighborhood include:

  • Sandalwood Yoga Studio at 5310 Germantown Ave
  • The One Less Foundation at 5275 Germantown Ave inside the historic Clarkson-Watson House (circa 1740)
  • Grumblethorpe at 5267 Germantown Ave, John Wister’s historic summer home built in 1744
  • Bargain Thrift at 5245 Germantown Ave
  • Around The Clock Home Health Care at 5226 Germantown Ave (current location)
  • Tasties at 5241 Germantown Ave
  • Kbello Kolors Hair Salon (tentative) at 5237 Germantown Ave
  • 5301 Germantown Ave (building currently being renovated by Ken Weinstein / Philly Office Retail)
  • 5320 Germantown Ave (building currently being renovated Stan Smith / Philly Office Retail)

Each participating business is contributing $25 per planter and has agreed to care for and water the new plants in front of their business. This project was made possible through generous donations from our community partners, who have helped to subsidize the costs of materials: Historic Germantown, Germantown United CDC, G’Town Restoration CDC, and the City of Philadelphia’s PhillyRising initiative, which selected Germantown as a Philly Rising 2.0 neighborhood in early February.

As Germantown continues to grow, Tree Germantown and the W Rockland Street Project will continue to push for greening and tree planting in our neighborhood.

Volunteers needed

Volunteering during the planting day is a great way to meet neighbors and get to know local business owners. Join us on Saturday, June 21 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Email treegermantown@gmail.com to sign-up and visit facebook.com/treegermantown for additional volunteer information.

planting_flyer_june21

Thanks again to our sponsors!

historic germantown phillyrising-logo GUCDC-logo gtownrestoration

Grant opportunity to design a neighborhood bulletin board

STONE_SOUP_LOGO-300x270Last month, Germantown United Community Development Corporation (GUCDC) launched the micro-grant program Stone Soup Saturdays, awarding grants to artists, designers, gardeners and other creatives for projects in four Germantown locations.

We’re excited that one of the locations just happens to be W Rockland Street and hope our idea for a neighborhood bulletin board inspires you!

Germantown United is looking for projects with the potential to create a catalyst for future beautification and development in the neighborhood, foster community ownership of public spaces and increase community pride. We like the sound of that!

While the deadline for proposals has past for the other three project locations, the deadline for W Rockland St has been extended until we find the right match. 

Community Exchange

To help shape the Stone Soup project on W Rockland St, we’re offering applicants some suggestions for a community exchange tool we’d like to experiment with on the block.

Recognizing that communication is paramount, we’re looking for a designer, architect or builder to help us create a neighborhood bulletin board. Our plan is to build two and install the boards at the highly visible vacant lot at the corner of Greene St and W Rockland St and outside of the community garden at 15 W Rockland St.

Our hope is that the bulletin board will become the go-to place for W Rockland St Project flyers and community news, helping to connect and inform nearby blocks. We would like the design to feature an accessible space for anyone to post flyers and a protective enclosed case for official W Rockland St Project communications (we distribute A LOT of flyers). The design must be able to withstand outdoor weather conditions and an urban environment.

Our project is all about the community. After the winning proposal is selected, we’ll organize a build-day with GUCDC and the designer and invite neighborhood residents to participate in the installation.

How Neighborhoods Share Information

Sure, lots of neighborhood communications have moved online, but here in Germantown we know there is still a place for the paper flyer. Over the past couple of months, we’ve been snapping photographs of outdoor bulletin boards at parks and gardens around Philadelphia for inspiration. Here are a few examples from Fishtown, Mt. Airy and Northern Liberties.

My favorite example is a neighborhood bulletin board in Lutheran Settlement House's garden on Frankford Avenue in Fishtown, near Master Street.

My favorite design sits in Lutheran Settlement House’s garden on Frankford Avenue in Fishtown, near Master Street.

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Submit Your Idea!

Grants of up to $1500 will be awarded for materials and artist stipends. There is a total of $7,500 available for implementation of all selected proposals. This program was made possible by a grant from the Samuel S. Fels Fund.

The W Rockland St Project will also help to assist with additional fundraising and materials donations to help lower the cost of the project.

The three other Stone Soup project locations identified by Germantown United CDC are: the unit block of West Haines Street at the garden space on the south side of Germantown Town Hall, the wall at the southwest corner of Chelten and Greene along the southbound bus stop at Greene St and Chelten Ave, and parking lot entryway of the Germantown Life Enrichment Center (GLEC) at 5772 Greene Street. GUCDC is no longer accepting applications for those projects.

To submit your project for W Rockland Street, download the Stone Soup Saturday application and email your pitch to info@germantownunitedcdc.org. If you have any questions, feel free to contact us!

Snow On The Block: Sidewalks Are For Everyone (S.A.F.E.)

Photo by @ainedoley

Photo by @ainedoley via Instagram. Monday, February 3, 2014.

Sidewalks are for everyone. 

It doesn’t really matter where you’re going or how you get there, just remember mostly everyone in the city has to step foot on a sidewalk. Whether you’re walking around the corner to the bus stop or 10 feet to your car, a few blocks to school or back and forth all day to the corner store – sidewalks are for everyone and everyone uses sidewalks!

About 60% of the households on West Rockland Street house awesome and/or responsible people who adequately cleared the snow from their sidewalks, so far this winter. The other 40% are f@$k!^g it up for everyone!

West Rockland Street is sloped, which makes navigating icy surfaces extra tricky. We hate seeing kids and adults slipping and sliding along the sidewalk every time they cross a patch of un-shoveled snow, or worse, walking in the middle of the street to play it safe. 

Want to keep people in your neighborhood safe in the snow, or simply avoid being fined when someone reports you? Clear your entire sidewalk. Don’t just create one of those little channels that cuts through the snow, the walls always cave in and you’ll be back where you started. It’s really not that hard. 

PS: You can make a lot of money shoveling snow, even in Germantown! So sick of hearing lazy people talk about how they used to go to other neighborhoods and shovel and make a mint but “people in the ghetto don’t want to pay.” I would pay you if you STFU and got to work!

PSS: Coincidentally, “Sidewalks Are For Everyone” also stands for S.A.F.E. 

W Rockland Street on Monday, February 3, 2014. Photo by @ainedoley via Instragram.

W Rockland Street on Monday, February 3, 2014. Photo by @ainedoley via Instragram.

Report a sidewalk that has not been cleared

To report a sidewalk or curb cut that has not been cleared, residents may call the Streets Department Customer Affairs Unit at (215) 686-5560. For all City services dial, 3-1-1 (or 215-686-8686).

The official rules for snow removal in Philadelphia are included below. If you have any other questions about snow in the city, the Philadelphia Streets Department has all sorts of fascinating information posted at philastreets.com

Slow melt. This is the sidewalk in front of a single-unit rental property on W Rockland Street that has not shoveled once this year. This photo was taken on Friday, January 31, 2014, nearly a month after the first significant snowstorm hit Philadelphia on January 3. The sidewalk has been a slippery slope since then.

Slow melt. This is the sidewalk in front of a single-unit rental property on W Rockland Street that has not shoveled once this year. This photo was taken on Friday, January 31, 2014, nearly a month after the first significant snowstorm hit Philadelphia on January 3. The sidewalk has been a slippery slope since then.

Close-up of the above pictured un-shoveled rental property on W Rockland Street.

Close-up of the above pictured un-shoveled rental property on W Rockland Street.

This is what the sidewalk on W Rockland Street looks like when you shovel. Photo taken on Friday, January 31, the same day as the above. Responsible people, to the left, irresponsible people to the right.

This is what the rest of the sidewalk on W Rockland Street looks like when you shovel. Photo taken on Friday, January 31, the same day as the above. Responsible people, to the left, irresponsible people to the right.

Philadelphia Code 10-720 Regarding Snow Removal From Sidewalks

According to Philadelphia Code (10-720),

“(1) the owner, agent, and tenants of any building or premise shall clear a path of not less than 36″ in width on all sidewalks, including curb cuts, abutting the building or premises within 6 (six) hours after the snow has ceased to fall. The path shall be thoroughly cleared of snow and ice. Where the width of any pavement measured from the property line to the curb is less than 3 (three) feet, the path cleared may be only 12 inches in width. When the building in question is a multifamily dwelling the owner or his agent shall be responsible for compliance with the requirements of this section.”

(2) Snow or ice removed from sidewalks, driveways, or other areas shall not be placed or piled in the street.

(3) Any person who violates this Section shall be subject to the provisions and penalties set forth in 10-718 and 10-719.

The penalty for violating this provision can range from “a minimum fine of fifty dollars ($50) to no more than three hundred dollars ($300) for each violation.”

Private plows piling snow in the street after city teams have cleared the road is illegal as well as a hazard to drivers and pedestrians.

via philastreet.com

Blooming Sidewalks: Greening the Urban Street

The sidewalk planter in front of our house!

The sidewalk planter in front of our house!

You may have noticed West Rockland Street has a lot of flower planters lining the sidewalk. You’d almost think you were walking along Germantown Avenue in the Chestnut Hill business district 🙂 So how did it happen?

Last year, a few households planted pots and set them out. Initially there was some fear that the planters would be stolen, broken or wrecked by kids. But, that didn’t happen.

This spring, Aine included sidewalk planters as a packaged item in the annual Grow This Block! planting day and a few more households joined the beautification effort. The idea really started to catch on as participation grew. Other residents admired the work of their neighbors and by mid-summer, more households joined the sidewalk planter club.

There are now over a fifteen planters lining the block, including five pots along the perimeter of the vacant lot at the corner of West Rockland and Greene Streets. To make the planters durable, residents weighted the pots down with heavy rocks and planted a variety of heat loving annuals. Three households also planted empty tree pits with full sidewalk gardens. Amazingly green!

Looking up West Rockland Street.

Looking up West Rockland Street.

Flower planters and sidewalk gardens are a motivating tool against blight and help brighten up the neighborhood. By setting beautiful examples and making it easy for people to get involved, we were able to get high participation. Aine purchased supplies in bulk and made a package deal (see the flyer below). For just $20, residents could purchase a planter with potting soil, plants, and rocks for the bottom. Residents then planted their own pots, which inspired people be creative and take ownership of their hard work.

Our planter packages were offered at a discount thanks to donations and support from a 2013 Philadelphia Activities Grant, awarded to the block by Councilwoman Cindy Bass. You can also reduce costs by buying in bulk, growing plants from seed and keeping an eye out for sales. If the sidewalk planter project can work on a little block in Southwest Germantown, then it can work anywhere. Get a few neighbors growing and create demand.

SEE A FULL GALLERY OF PHOTOS ON FLICKR!

JuJu biking by Aine's planter.

JuJu biking by Aine’s planter. Photo by Ann Doley.

Aine and Jamir tending our flower pot.

Aine and Jamir tending our flower pot.

2013.07.19_Rockland Street Planters Flyer

Download a PDF of the flyer.

Cobblestones rescued from Germantown Avenue construction

Cobblestones rescued from Germantown Avenue construction.

A new sidewalk garden grows. In the fall, a new street tree will be planted in its place.

A new sidewalk garden grows. In the fall, a new street tree will be planted in its place.

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